Best website builder for makers, sellers and doers.

Joomla is ideal if you’re looking to build a large-scale or complex site, without the need to do any excessive coding. The default platform has a slight edge on WordPress when it comes to group administration and development. For instance, there’s even a dedicated messenger function to enhance collaboration. If you are interested in setting up a Joomla website, check out our Joomla tutorial.
If you are trying to get a cool short domain name, chances are high that this name will be taken. Don’t give up too soon, though, many of these domains are up for sale and waiting for their new owners. If you are ready to spend extra dollars, spend time doing research, and negotiate with the seller. The tricky part about purchasing domains is that you cannot really estimate the value (as you can with cars, phones, computers, etc.) for your negotiations. Salesforce.com paid $4.5 million for the domain name Data.com. Folks from WebFlow were able to buy webflow.com domain for around $3,000. Recently we’ve helped our friends to find domain name BoldGrid.com for the regular price of $15. Each case is different, but, if you’re willing to spend some time and money, you could get the domain name you want relatively cheap. We’ve detailed the process below.	

Thank you! I tried to sign up for your list and freebie, but you use Aweber, which has blacklisted me for years! I put a half dozen quite spammie emails into Spam ("Hurry, Last day for ___") and was forever and unforgivably condemned to their ship list... I have fought through to a human at Aweber twice, and both swore they could do nothing about it! Sad, but thus far and no farther! Thanks for the analyses, Sam

I am looking for a replacement for WordPress, or to simply implement WordPress on my new site so I can tell bloated, overpriced godaddy to take a hike. Like you, I would much rather run nothing in PHP. I realize that other technologies like Java servlets are not as easy, but given most people using WordPress are not using PHP, I can’t believe they simply left it as the only underlying technology. It is always being attacked and perpetually buggy.
It is preferably more simple, light-weight and is a clutter-free content management system. The flexibility is obviously not great as WordPress. But it is surely an amazing platform if you are willing to forgo the large but complex marketplace of WordPress. Best suited for beginners, bloggers or anyone looking to create a simple, elegant and easy-to-manage website, Ghost can be an awesome alternative for WordPress if you are looking for one!
Once you’ve determined whether your domain is available, you will want to purchase it from a domain registrar or web hosting company. Some web hosts will register a domain name for you for free (usually for one year) when you buy a web hosting services from them, while others will do it for you, but you’ll have to cover the registrar fees (an annual fee of $10 – $15 for the “.com” domain).
Nameboy helps you find available domain names based on keywords you choose. Enter up to two keywords, and Nameboy will instantly deliver a list of suggested domain names. Their charts make it easy to determine which extensions are taken and which ones you can still snag. For example, even though hostingfacts.com is taken, other users can still purchase HostingFacts.net.
A good domain name is in the eye of the beholder. If you are looking for a domain name for your new startup then something brandable is a good choice. However, if you are looking for domain name for your new blog about dogs, then it’s best to use something descriptive. For most purposes we recommend using a .com domain, but .net and .org domains can also work well.
Instant Domain Search is a tool that works well if you already have a domain name in mind. Start by typing in your idea, and this tool will tell you if it’s taken or not. If it is, they’ll suggest alternatives that are currently available. They’ll also let you know which ones are up for auction. You can buy through links on the site that will take you straight to GoDaddy to complete your purchase. If the domain is taken, you can follow links to either look up who owns the site or to hire an agent to help you make an offer on that domain.
I don’t know where you are based but I can tell you that in much of the English-speaking world the word “Jew” itself has quite problematic undertones. These days, you would usually speak of Jewish people/persons or say that someone is Jewish. In addition to that, using Jewish people as a stand-in for frugality is pretty offensive as this is a stereotype often used to discriminate against the Jewish population. For both reasons, I would strongly discourage you from using it as part of your business name and also reconsider if that is a nickname you want to continue using for yourself.	

Another possibility is that your intended domain name is reserved, but not in use, not publicly listed for sale and not up for auction. If this is the case, try contacting the domain owner to see if they're willing to sell it. See if the contact details are listed on the site. If not, you can try to find it by looking up the domain owner’s information using a Whois search. In 40 to 50 percent of cases, you'll find the domain owner information there.
Using a search engine like Google, search for your proposed blog or website name. Does your search show any sites with similar domain names? If it does, try a different name. Giving your website a name that's similar to other existing sites is the first step to failure. Also, don't choose names that are plural or misspelled versions of existing sites.
Your new domain is going to be your branded business name. You need to ensure that future social media profiles are available. Use Knowem.com to quickly check profile availability for your new brand and instantly reserve handles from services like Twitter, Facebook, Instagram, Pinterest, and others. It’s probably not a good idea to buy a brandable domain if its corresponding social profiles that are already taken.

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I am biased towards WordPress, just FYI. I train new bloggers and website owners (non-profits and small businesses, etc) in setting up WordPress.org with an SSL and I do it in an 8-hour class. My point being I recommend you setup: 1) WordPress.org NOT WordPress.com; 2) Go with 1and1.com “Unlimited” + SSL (costs about $62 for 12 months, includes: domain name, SSL Certificate + web hosting). This will get you a web hosting account with a domain name, SSL and 1-year of web hosting for the cost of a SSL Certificate (most are $60+). Why SSL? because your site will display https and you can process online payments using Stripe.com (Payment processor similar to PayPal, Authorize.net, etc). I have setup at least 6 of these accounts exactly like this for attendees and clients. This will work for you and it will not have any ads popping up unless you put them there. Any questions just reply.	

But we cannot deny that the end result is great once you get the hang of it. Being an all-in-one platform, WordPress has its pros and cons. If you are focused on a specific purpose then too much of WordPress features might just get you all jumbled up. So today we wanted to give out options that are similar in features but are concentrated more on a specific purpose like blogging, eCommerce, or simply website creation!
We believe in democratizing publishing and the freedoms that come with open source. Supporting this idea is a large community of people collaborating on and contributing to this project. The WordPress community is welcoming and inclusive. Our contributors’ passion drives the success of WordPress which, in turn, helps you reach your goals. More Info »
All that being said, October’s gets pretty rough the closer you look. The community isn’t deep or broad enough to support a wide enough range of prebuilt plugins or themes, and to make that worse the October crew has set up a weird cloud-based “project” validation thing, in the interest of being security conscious I believe. Regardless of the intent, it makes it super-difficult for newbies to figure out how add, update, or edit any of the plugins on their site. And heaven help you if you decide to ‘detach’ your site from a project … ::sigh::
Once you’ve decided on your top choices for your site name, make sure you are not violating anyone’s trademarks. To check within US, visit uspto.gov/trademarks and do the search before you register the name. It is always good to check now because this could kill a great website and business down the road. Also, if you are going to include some big name product, such as Twitter or Facebook, review their terms and conditions. Most will not allow you to use their name in any part of your domain.
I don’t know where you are based but I can tell you that in much of the English-speaking world the word “Jew” itself has quite problematic undertones. These days, you would usually speak of Jewish people/persons or say that someone is Jewish. In addition to that, using Jewish people as a stand-in for frugality is pretty offensive as this is a stereotype often used to discriminate against the Jewish population. For both reasons, I would strongly discourage you from using it as part of your business name and also reconsider if that is a nickname you want to continue using for yourself.
Bonus Tip: Make sure your name doesn't accidentally spell out anything embarrassing when the words are smushed together. For example, if you wanted to make a blog all about things you and your girlfriends say, Girls Talking is a short memorable name that fits most of our advice here very well. However, you probably don't want to rush out and buy girlstalking.com, right?
As we’ve been saying, shorter is better. If you can’t get your domain name down to one memorable word (almost impossible to come by these days), then consider adding one or maximum two more words. Combinations of two words work great for the memorable names like LifeHacker.com or GeekSquad.com. Also, don’t use an acronym. People will never remember the letters unless it’s a highly catchy name.
How To Choose A Perfect Domain Name
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