Best website builder for makers, sellers and doers.

Whether you are planning to launch a new website, write a blog, develop a web service or establish a start up company – the domain name is one of the important factors which decides the success or failure of your online venture. Choosing the right domain name for your business or organization is necessary because there is no undo button, when you have registered one.
You surely have heard the name before! Joomla is yet another powerful and popular name when it comes to CMS platforms. It is free, multi-purpose and is built on the model-view-controller web application framework. Already with millions of users by its side, it will be celebrating it’s 14th year of establishment this year! Although not as widely popular as WordPress, it is equally competitive and is a great alternative!
If you are trying to get a cool short domain name, chances are high that this name will be taken. Don’t give up too soon, though, many of these domains are up for sale and waiting for their new owners. If you are ready to spend extra dollars, spend time doing research, and negotiate with the seller. The tricky part about purchasing domains is that you cannot really estimate the value (as you can with cars, phones, computers, etc.) for your negotiations. Salesforce.com paid $4.5 million for the domain name Data.com. Folks from WebFlow were able to buy webflow.com domain for around $3,000. Recently we’ve helped our friends to find domain name BoldGrid.com for the regular price of $15. Each case is different, but, if you’re willing to spend some time and money, you could get the domain name you want relatively cheap. We’ve detailed the process below.
When it comes to WordPress, an all-in-one platform for website creation, blogging, content management and more, there are very few that competes. That being said, it has its advantages and disadvantages. Especially when it comes to a specific purpose focused project or site creation, sometimes less is more. And although WordPress is the first choice of millions all over the world, sometimes we cannot help but wonder, are there any alternatives?
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If you are marketing yourself, ideally you'll be able to use your first and last names (johnsmith.com or janesmith.com). Even if you aren't marketing yourself, it's not a bad idea to register your name as a domain now, in case you want to use it in the future. If you are marketing your business, you should see if your business name (yourbusiness.com) is available.
Once you’ve determined whether your domain is available, you will want to purchase it from a domain registrar or web hosting company. Some web hosts will register a domain name for you for free (usually for one year) when you buy a web hosting services from them, while others will do it for you, but you’ll have to cover the registrar fees (an annual fee of $10 – $15 for the “.com” domain).
Nameboy helps you find available domain names based on keywords you choose. Enter up to two keywords, and Nameboy will instantly deliver a list of suggested domain names. Their charts make it easy to determine which extensions are taken and which ones you can still snag. For example, even though hostingfacts.com is taken, other users can still purchase HostingFacts.net.
When it comes to WordPress, an all-in-one platform for website creation, blogging, content management and more, there are very few that competes. That being said, it has its advantages and disadvantages. Especially when it comes to a specific purpose focused project or site creation, sometimes less is more. And although WordPress is the first choice of millions all over the world, sometimes we cannot help but wonder, are there any alternatives?

In this post, we’ll be comparing the 14 most popular alternatives to WordPress available — covering general website building tools, content management systems, website management platforms and e-commerce platforms. In short, systems that can all be used by relatively inexperienced users as tools for building new websites. We’ll cover their basic features, their pros and cons and how each one compares to WordPress.
I have recently used Wix website builder to create a site for my college assessment on social media module. I would like to upgrade this website to have a personal domain and use it to promote myself/career progression in the long term and finding a bit difficult to come up with a name. Was thinking of using NaomisZone.com , NaomisBuzzworld.com, NaomisCareerProgression.com, Naomiscareerinterests.com, NaomiOdoiOyster.com
I’ve made some use of Kirby CMS. It’s a really well put together flat file CMS. It takes some coding out of the box to get it set up as desired, but then it’s a pleasure to use. Advantages of not having a database include simpler setup, and the ease of version control of the whole site. Statamic is a similar option, though I’ve not spent any significant time using it.
Domain Puzzler is a simple tool with many options. Start with the “easy” version, and insert your ideal keywords, choose your domain extensions, and search for ideas. The cool thing about this domain name generator is that you can include numerous keywords as opposed to just one or two like the other tools on this list, and it will combine your keywords into different variations. Add results to your favorites list, or try a more advanced search. You can also use the tool to compare the page rank of different domain names.
I agree with you that Pulse CMS offers an interesting way to go, without databases. Before moving all my sites to WP over the past two years, I had always felt reluctant to use databases: but testing WP had convinced me to go ahead. Although I do not use it at this point (I played a little bit with previous versions), I bought a Pulse CMS license, if only in order to support that interesting project. I do not rule out using it for a site some day, at least experimentally.
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