Best website builder for makers, sellers and doers.

Thanks for this informative article, but I am still a bit confused. I am a novice blogger but I would much rather do it right the first time…but what is right? I had my mind set on wordpres.com until I read various articles that compare wordpress.org and .com. I don’t want ads popping up on my blog unless i put them there and I don’t want the company to own my content. Ideally, I was going to purchase a theme that supports music, video, photos but now I don’t know what to do. Can someone please point me in the right direction?
2020.07.12.-excellentbookmarks.com
While WordPress is pretty much the preferred publishing platform for the mass all over the world, during the recent years, WordPress has become more than just a blogging platform. This is where the WordPress alternative Ghost comes into play. It is a NodeJS based blogging open-source platform that was designed especially for the purpose of online publishing for bloggers. Released not so long ago, this project has already achieved four times more than it originally aimed for.
Instant Domain Search is a tool that works well if you already have a domain name in mind. Start by typing in your idea, and this tool will tell you if it’s taken or not. If it is, they’ll suggest alternatives that are currently available. They’ll also let you know which ones are up for auction. You can buy through links on the site that will take you straight to GoDaddy to complete your purchase. If the domain is taken, you can follow links to either look up who owns the site or to hire an agent to help you make an offer on that domain.
You would not commonly include the legal entity (Ltd., LLC, etc.) in your domain name unless it is somehow part of your brand (e.g. the record label “Murder Inc.”). So, that’s probably not a good idea. In addition, your store name suggestions seem generic and not very memorable. The store name should either be a brand name (think “Adidas”, “Siemens”, “Nike”) or something that describes what you do/offer (e.g. “Reaj Kitchen Interiors”). Otherwise, it’s unlikely anyone will remember the name or find you online.

The one thing you didn’t discuss much in your article is how easy for the client it is, using the CMS *after* the developer walks away. One reason I love WP is I can show you how to add a new blogpost in 10m flat, regardless of your tech ability – and barring that, set up an email drop so it’s even simpler. October fits the mold of Joomla, Drupal, and a few others with a learning curve that’ll be quite a bit steeper for some clients.
Why You Shouldn't Use WordPress! And Why WordPress is Bad

×